Guest Voice: How Mental Health Nutrition keeps you Stress-Free and Happy

Happy Living | Blog“The right diet can do wonders to reduce stress’s impact on your life.”
(Mark Hyman, MD)

I recently found the Happy Living community through Twitter, and I immediately knew it was something special. The thing I love the most is the Something Significant Podcast, where I can find amazing interviews of people who are doing incredible things in the world.

I just graduated from University of Nova Gorica with the thesis: The analysis of psychosocial risks at the workplace in a selected organization.  During my studies, I learned that psychosocial risks and stress are some of the biggest challenges in life, but that they can be successfully managed and prevented with the right approach.  Reducing stress in our everyday lives is vital for maintaining our overall health, as it can improve our mood, boost immune function, promote longevity and allow us to be more productive. So, I’m here to share that message with everyone so that they can take care before burnout occurs.

Although many people are unaware of it, the food we eat or don’t eat can affect the health of our body and our mind. Our body needs a diverse and balanced intake of nutrients to maintain a great state of health and to give our brain the energy to function fully. The foods we eat provide minerals, vitamins and nutrients to our brain and body, and when we don’t eat what is necessary, imbalances start to appear. Additionally, we may be sensitive to certain foods or food components—such as gluten, sugar, selfish, or eggs—and if we don’t recognize those sensitivities, that can cause problems. The fact that we can’t live on pizza, ice-cream, and french fries alone can be easily observed in the appearance of problems like weight gain, trouble focusing, constant fatigue, lack of energy, dull skin, and hair loss, just to name a few.

We really need to opt for a different approach when it comes to the foods we eat.

When we start feeling poorly, physically or mentally, that stress appears in our lives. We hate not feeling okay, and this, in and of itself, induces stress. The biggest mistake people make when confronting stress is not considering what a large role diet plays in how we’re feeling and how stress is manifesting in our lives. Most of us are not aware that what we eat can actually put us in a miserable state and seriously affect our health. Or if we are addressing diet, many of us do it because we want to look good…not necessarily to improve our overall health. As a result, foods that help us to lose weight have become much more important than the foods that actually provide the best nutrition for our body and brain. While there is nothing wrong with wanting to lose weight and look better, we have to understand that we need to consider nourishing our mind just as much as we consider how we look and feel in our body.  What good is it to be slimmer if you still feel bad?

The human brain is an incredibly complex anatomical mechanism not fully understood by science. It controls the way we feel, how well we can focus, and our energy levels. If our brains are deprived of the nutrients they need, we can’t rid ourselves of the negative states of mind that make it impossible to enjoy life fully on all fronts, no matter how good we look or how thin we are. This is part of the reason why eating just plain salad and drinking water for every meal can make you feel bad, cause fatigue, and affect your ability to concentrate. While the salad is good for weight loss, it does not provide the amount and variety of nutrients necessary for the brain to do its job. And a brain that is not fully functioning won’t be able to give your body the appropriate commands.

If you’re wondering how to begin telling which foods are good and bad for your mental health, you can start by creating a journal in which you jot down everything you eat. This will support you in noticing what foods you’re consuming that may be associated with negative states of mind. For looking great and having a healthy brain, we should focus on enjoying a healthy and diverse diet composed of fresh fruits and vegetables and moderate portions of high-quality meat. That said, everybody is different, which is why it is extremely important to monitor what you’re eating so that you can begin to see what kind of effects it has on your body and mind.

Great more great info at Maja’s website:shampootruth.com

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Disclaimer: This disclaimer informs readers that the views, thoughts, and opinions expressed in the text of this Guest Voice post belong solely to the author, and not necessarily to Happy Living.

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Bone Broth Is One Of The Most Powerful Superfoods On The Planet

Happy Living | Blog“A good broth can raise the dead.”
(South American Proverb)

Abel James is an entrepreneur, real-food crusader and the New York Times bestselling author of The Wild Diet: Go Beyond Paleo to Burn Fat, Beat Cravings, and Drop 20 Pounds in 40 days. With the #1-rated Health podcast in 8 countries, Abel’s award-winning web series Fat-Burning Man has helped millions reclaim their health through cutting-edge science, outdoor workouts, and outrageously good food.

After meeting him at the 2016 Paleo f(x) conference in Austin, Texas, I first introduced Abel to the Happy Living community a year ago with his post: How to Take Your Health into Your Own Hands. Then, at the 2017 conference, I was inspired to add bone broth to my daily nutritional practice; so naturally, I turned to the Fat-Burning Man for guidance.

I am pleased to welcome Abel’s voice back to Happy Living. In today’s guest post, he shares how you can make bone broth to heal your gut, reverse aging, and cure the common cold. His recipe is easy, delicious, and super good for your health.


Abel says:

What is it about “soup” that makes it good for us when we’re sick?

Homemade bone broth is one of the most powerful superfoods on the planet. It’s made by simmering the bones of a (preferably pasture-raised) animal for 10 – 24 hours in a slow-cooker, or 24 – 48 hours for beef bones. This low, slow cooking draws out the collagen, marrow, and other healing elements from the bones, including amino acids, minerals, glycine, and gelatin—which helps heal the gut and reduce inflammation.

My wife and I pretty much always have a batch of bone broth simmering on the counter. I’ll drink a cup of it in the late morning with a bit of sea salt, or we’ll use it to make soups and stews. Broth can be a powerful weight-management tool, it keeps your joints lubricated, provides your bones with necessary nutrients, and makes your skin soft and elastic.

Broths are rich in nutrients that are difficult to source elsewhere—incredibly high in vital minerals like calcium, phosphorous, magnesium, and potassium.

You can use the bones (and legs from poultry, which are rich in restorative collagen) from pastured chicken, grass-fed cattle, fish, crustaceans, or anything else that was Recently Alive and Well (R.A.W.). Leftovers work well, too—take the picked-over carcass of a roasted fowl or the leftover bones from a roast or seafood meal. If you’re in a hurry, you can even throw in a whole fish.

Not only are bone broths packed with nutrition, they’re an excellent way to save money on your grocery bill because you’re skipping prepared soups and broth. Plus, you’re doing your part to use the whole animal and reduce waste.

Unlike real bone broth, processed soup from a can like Campbell’s or Hormel is packed with sodium, preservatives, cornstarch, wheat, artificial flavors, MSG, sugar, and none of the things that make real homemade soup nourishing.

Traditionally, chicken broth is made from slowly simmering a whole chicken for hours along with vegetables and seasonings. Finally, the bones are removed, the chicken stripped off, and chopped vegetables are added.

Alyson, bless her heart, always whips me up bone broth soup when I’m under the weather. It takes less than 10 minutes to prepare, but it can cut the duration of your cold in half. It has plenty of bug-fighting goodness that will fix you right up in no time.

Abel, thank you for sharing your voice with our community at Happy Living.

Take one more click to see Abel’s complete post as it was last updated on January 4, 2016.

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What I Have Learned (So Far) About The Impossible Dream

Happy Living | Blog“Impossible is just a big word thrown around by small men who find it easier to live in the world they’ve been given than to explore the power they have to change it. Impossible is not a fact. It’s an opinion. Impossible is not a declaration. It’s a dare. Impossible is potential. Impossible is temporary. Impossible is nothing.”
(Muhammad Ali) 

Throughout my book, Turning Inspiration Into Action, I used two literary devices: Lightning Bolts and MBG Life Lessons. Lightning Bolts indicate those moments of sudden inspiration that led to significant transformations of my life, and MBG Life Lessons are the most important things I have learned along the way. I use my own initials—my full name is Matthew Brian Gersper—to highlight the fact that these are my life lessons, and I do not presume that they should apply to you or anyone else.

Today I celebrate our 400th blog post by sharing What I Have Learned (So Far) About The Impossible Dream.


MBG Life Lesson: I’d rather follow my own dreams and fail than succeed by conforming to “what I am supposed to do.”

On the back patio of our home in Walnut Creek, my mom and dad were having an intense discussion with long-time family friends. We had lived next door to them during my early elementary school days. Our families’ bond had grown through the years. The parents had watched each other’s kids grow up. Our friendship had a familial feel to it. We were close. We looked out for each other. We loved each other.

It was love that brought them to our patio to have a very difficult discussion with my parents. They had observed over the years how my mom and dad supported my dream to become a pro football player. They knew my parents “spent money they didn’t have” to support my football camps. They had heard them tell me, a thousand times, I could become anything I wanted, if I “was willing to work long enough and hard enough for it.”

When I was a little boy, my parents’ friends had thought my football dream was cute. I was a junior in high school now. It wasn’t cute anymore. They “knew” that I wasn’t going to become a professional football player and thought my parents had better sit me down and set me straight. And they felt that if my parents didn’t do this, they were setting me up for a big failure.

It took a lot of courage for them to take this stand with my parents. It risked their friendship. They did it because they believed every word they said, and because they loved me and wanted me to have every opportunity for a successful life. They weren’t alone in their opinion, either. My dream to become a pro football player typically received one of two responses from those around me: either it was dismissed as the fanciful dream of a little boy or derided as a wasteful fantasy for a middle-class, educated young man who should become well-rounded and should be pursuing more realistic goals. My parents accepted their advice as well intentioned, but it didn’t change their mind or behavior. Fortunately, the friendship survived.

How many dreams are killed before they even get started? How many inspirations are tamped down because the tampers don’t understand the dreamers? How many great lives are made average by choosing or being forced onto a safer, more realistic path? I didn’t have many assets on my difficult journey to becoming a professional football player, but the two biggest ones I had were heart and belief.

Heart: I wanted it deep down inside me. I was willing to do almost anything.

Belief: I really, truly believed I could do it.


As it turns out, I wasn’t quite able to make it as a professional football player. After high school, I played four more years in college. I kept the dream alive for two more years after college, eventually signing contracts with three different professional football teams (Saskatchewan Roughriders, Los Angeles Raiders, Orlando Renegades) in three different leagues (Canadian Football League, National Football League, United States Football League), only to be released before the season began each time.

My life experience has proven this quote from Ray Dalio’s book Principles: Life and Work:

If you work hard and creatively, you can have just about anything you want, but not everything you want.

The ten years I spent as a football player, chasing the ultimate outcome of becoming a pro, taught me to dream big, work hard, and believe nothing is impossible. In my thirty years of life after football, I’ve learned that I never get every outcome I want, but that’s OK. I’ve discovered something much better: the continuous process of choosing work I love, chasing big dreams, and believing anything is possible has enriched my day-to-day life in ways I could never have imagined.

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Your Voice: Discover What’s Important

Happy Living | Blog“Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.”
(Winston Churchill)

The Your Voice series is a celebration of you, our awesome readers all around the globe. We know you aspire to a better life for yourself and for those you love. You believe, as we do, that a better self is always possible, today, every day, for the rest of your life.

We celebrate you by bringing your voice to life on our pages at Happy Living. Whenever you feel inspired by one of our posts, books, blog theatre, talks, or podcasts, we want to hear from you. And when we do, we hope your voice will inspire others, so that together, we can improve the health and wellbeing of the world, one person at a time.

Today, we are excited to feature the voice of an Anna Sabino. Anna writes that “The Belief Road Map inspires us to discover what’s important.”


I bought this book after having met the author at the World Domination Summit, conference in Portland. The Belief Road Map inspires us to discover what’s important. Matt explores mindfully philosophies, which are crucial in life. The author takes an introspective look into physical, mental and financial fitness, he looks closer into different kinds of love we exhibit.
We are driven to manifest feelings and beliefs inspired by love and our own definition of success. Grab The Belief Road Map to become more aware of what matters to you.
– Anna Sabino


You, dear reader, inspire us to write and to live by the words we write too. You are our purpose at Happy Living, and we are so grateful to you. It is both humbling and amazing to hear the voice of readers like Anna Sabino. Thank you for sharing the journey of Happy Living with us.

To lend your voice to Your Voice at Happy Living, just click here to share what inspires you!

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Something Significant Podcast: Joe Jacobi

Happy Living | Podcast“Life is full of obstacle illusions.”
(Grant Frazier)

It doesn’t surprise me that an Olympic gold-medalist in canoe slalom has a unique perspective on overcoming obstacles. The Olympian in question is Joe Jacobi; he and his partner Scott Strausbaugh won a gold medal in the 1992 Summer Olympic Games in Barcelona. During our interview, I asked him, “What obstacles have you faced in your pursuit of significance and how did you overcome them?”

I loved his answer.

Joe said that being a whitewater canoeist for almost forty years has taught him that, as we navigate the currents of our lives and careers, there are going to be rocks in the river. Up until a pivotal weekend in his life—which he describes in detail during our interview—Joe’s strategy for overcoming obstacles had been “staying as far away from all of the rocks as [he] possibly could; the further away from the rocks, the better.”

That one significant weekend changed things though, and Joe began to realize it had been a huge mistake: trying to avoid the so-called rocks. He started understanding that “those rocks create the magic of life,” and today, Joe tries to get closer to what he perceives as his obstacles, rather than avoiding them.

“When you come closer to your obstacles, you find a greater force of energy with which to work.” Joe has figured out that “those rocks (obstacles) are what create the current of our lives—the ‘river’ current of our careers.”

“You cannot succeed by trying to avoid the rocks. You’ve got to take the strategy of trying to come closer to them, where there is more force to align with, more magic with which to align. And that is how you get better. It’s by not running from your obstacles, but in coming closer to them.”

If you’re reading this, you are in for a real treat. The interview you’re about to hear is chock full of wisdom, inspiration, and a unique perspective on life from a highly accomplished, yet genuinely humble man, who cares deeply about helping others. Enjoy your time with Joe Jacobi.

Follow Joe…

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Joe’s book recommendations…

Choose Yourself by James Altucher

The Power of Full Engagement by Jim Loehr

Perennial Seller by Ryan Holiday

Turning Inspiration Into Action by Matt Gersper

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#19 – Premium Gasoline

Happy Living | Blog Theatre
Blog Tester, Scott, takes his body for a drive… | Read the post that inspired this Blog Theatre®

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Your Voice: Editorial Review – Inspiring Women

Happy Living | Blog | Your Voice“When we are thriving, we want to help and uplift others. When we have found such significance ourselves we feel the need to help others find their and fulfill it in the world.”
(Hemalayaa Behl)

The Your Voice series is a celebration of you, our awesome readers all around the globe. We know you aspire to a better life for yourself and for those you love. You believe, as we do, that a better self is always possible, today, every day, for the rest of your life.

We celebrate you by bringing your voice to life on our pages at Happy Living. Whenever you feel inspired by one of our posts, books, blog theatre, talks, or podcasts, we want to hear from you. And when we do, we hope your voice will inspire others, so that together, we can improve the health and wellbeing of the world, one person at a time.

Today, we are excited to feature the editorial review for our upcoming book, Inspiring Women:Here to Make a Significant Mark on the World, from Kelly McKain, who has been an editor for Happy Living Books Independent Publishers and our Blog.


Matt, it’s been a great pleasure to work with you on Inspiring Women. In your words, ‘significance is the big secret to happiness and purpose,’ and this book brings that fact alive for the reader through candid interviews with eleven inspiring women, from many different professions and backgrounds.

While editing the text, I found myself nodding in agreement, cheering, laughing, and yes, crying too. Every woman and girl—and indeed every human being!—who reads this book will find something to inspire them within its pages: something to ignite their desire to share their unique gifts with the world; something to give them the confidence and sense of self-worth to do just that; and something to fuel their commitment to making a positive difference to the lives of others. In short, they will find something significant, something of great significance, in Inspiring Women.

These are the stories of eleven women who have found their ‘why’ and who are now living it…building their everyday lives around their true purpose. These women leap off the page and straight into readers’ hearts – as guides, as mentors, as friends – all their voices ringing clear with integrity and truth. As you say in your introduction, Matt, ‘You’ll find real, raw, intimate details of what drives them to do what they do.’

So, dear reader, get ready to meet inspiring women who are deeply immersed in work they love, creating something genuinely connected to who they are, and bringing tremendous value to others in the process. It has been a huge honor to be part of this project, Matt, and it’s with great pride that I join you in sharing Inspiring Women with the women of the world. -Kelly McKain


Thank you Kelly for sharing the journey of Happy Living with us.

To lend your voice to Your Voice at Happy Living, just click here to share what inspires you!

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Living in the Moment Sometimes Means Letting Go

Happy Living | Block“Do not dwell in the past, do not dream of the future, concentrate the mind on the present moment”
(Buddha)

My dear friend Jacqueline warned me that pregnancy is one of life’s events that breaks you open, leaving you forever changed. I say “warned” not because transformation is a bad thing, but rather because transformation of any kind can be unsettling, to put it mildly. It can be unsettling to experience changes that ultimately mean you won’t be the same person at the end of something as you were at the beginning–especially when you are still in the middle of it.

The process of becoming pregnant, which I wrote about last month, was unsettling in its own way. It was the first time in my life that I experienced my body not doing exactly what I wanted it to do during the exact time frame I wanted it done. As a result, many of my meditation sessions were spent reminding myself that timing wasn’t what was most important…that my commitment to the process and to the outcome were, regardless of how long it took. Keeping myself focused on the present moment and reminding myself that I was not ultimately in control of whether or not I got pregnant (after all, there had to be a baby spirit that wanted to come through me) is what got me through. I often used Louise Hay’s affirmation, “Divine right actions are always taking place in my life.” You’ll notice it does not say “divine right timing,” as timing is often irrelevant (and largely out of our control) in the most important aspects of our lives.

Actually being pregnant has also brought moments that have challenged my ability to stay present and enjoy this process. I’ve worried about how I am going to deliver this baby into the world without a bunch of potentially unnecessary interventions thrust on me by a well-meaning, but perhaps jumpy, medical team. I’ve questioned how to pick a pediatrician who will help me make decisions for my baby’s care, setting him up for a lifetime of health, rather than just managing symptoms he may have when he’s little. I’ve questioned whether or not I will be available enough to guide him on his life’s journey while also completing my own mission to help people heal their lives through the power of food. And I’ve cried a lot as I’ve wrestled with these thoughts, and again, ultimately come to realize that I don’t have much control over those outcomes, which is really hard when it feels like they are all the right outcomes!

This struggle—of realizing I am not ultimately in control of becoming pregnant, the health of my child, or the future of my career while attempting to remain open to all of them as wonderful possibilities—has been the most profound example I’ve encountered of one of the four agreements, as outlined in the book of the same name by don Miguel Ruiz: “Always do your best.” I’ve always appreciated this tenet of Ruiz’s book because “your best” changes from day to day, and sometimes, from moment to moment. The only thing we can ever do is whatever our best is in the present moment, trusting that our efforts and intentions will manifest in the best way possible in future present moments.

For me right now, this means: hiring a medical team that I trust and that has a similar philosophy to childbirth that I do, then letting go of the outcome, knowing that we will all do our best—for me and for my baby—when the time comes. Doing my best means interviewing pediatricians, using thoughtful questions to check that our philosophies on healthcare align, and hiring the one that seems the best suited. It means letting go of worry about all the “what if” scenarios that may never come to pass. My best means recognizing and taking care of what is critical in this moment, knowing that what’s important for my baby and for my career will all get done…when the moment is right. In divine right timing, which may or may not align with my idea of right timing!

All this brings me back to the title of this post, “Sometimes living in the moment means letting go.” Right now, doing my best for my baby and myself means relinquishing my sense of control over career outcomes that lie somewhere in the future to live in this moment, fully present to the needs of my postpartum self and to my baby’s needs as he begins his life as a tiny human. That means that I am letting go of work…for at least a little while. No more helping clients one-on-one or in group settings, no more contributing to other people’s articles, no more writing for my own blog or working on my book, and no more guest blogging for Happy Living. Essentially, no more doing the things I love doing and that I believe are helping people be happier and healthier.

For now.

I think I’ll come back to all of it eventually. I hope I will. But of course, I have no way of knowing what the best thing will be for me in the future, and I am open to the possibility that being a mother will further transform my view of what’s important and of what it means to do my best.

So, for now, I’m letting go of life, as I have known it, to live in this beautiful present. And as I do, I’m trusting that the Universe is conspiring to bring about the highest possible good for me, my baby, and everyone around us… including you.

As I step away from my role as a Happy Living expert to focus on my new role as Mom, I send each of you light and love as you continue to seek health and well-being in all aspects of your life. And I am grateful to Matt for allowing me to be part of the Happy Living team and to Kyle, Kaileen, Kelly and Tyla for helping me use my voice more effectively.

Until we meet again,

 

 

 

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Something Significant: Todd White, Dry Farm Wines Pt. 2

Happy Living | Blog“The energy that you put out comes back to you.”
(Eckhart Tolle)

Dear reader, welcome back. I hope you enjoyed Part 1 of my Something Significant interview with Todd White.

What obstacles have you faced in your pursuit of significance? How did you overcome them?

Surprisingly, we have not felt any real obstacles yet with Dry Farm Wines, even while growing 100X. It’s just been very flow-driven and remarkably smooth.

I think most obstacles come from a life view of scarcity and expectation. I’ve been an entrepreneur for a long, long time, and I didn’t get it right until this company. In my previous life, I was always struggling and striving and clawing. I was successful, but I wasn’t very peaceful; my success wasn’t filled with love, it was filled with battles. There were constant battles: with people I worked with, with vendors, with customers. Constant battles of one kind or another, and I had to persevere through every battle. And I did. I achieved financial success but not fulfillment. Certainly not joy… and certainly not peace! When I lived a life of expectation, I would strive and attack any obstacle I encountered. I faced obstacles as adversaries to defeat. In the past, overcoming obstacles was a battle that I had to win with sheer determination and grit.

It took me a few decades to figure it out, but today, at Dry Farm Wines, we don’t fight obstacles; we allow obstacles to become the way, to create the path. We embrace a practice of abundance, not scarcity. We believe that everything has a place and purpose. If something is not meant to be, we don’t struggle against it. We release it. And we fully embrace those things that are meant to be.

Matt, I’ve never had a business that was this easy and flowed with so much abundance without struggle. We never strive at Dry Farm Wines. We like to say that we thrive. Today, I live a peaceful life.

What is one thing you wish you had known 10 years ago?

One big one is the power of positive vibrations. I wish I had known that a life of peace attracts peace. And a life of abundance attracts abundance. Oh, I wish I had known back then that I didn’t have to strive, or struggle, or go to war to become financially successful. I wish I had known that I just needed to create value and to project love and peace, and that when I do those things, love and peace are projected right back at me. I wish I had known to accept things as they are (appreciation) not as I wanted them to be (expectation).

Another thing, of course, is the power of meditation to subdue the egoic-mind, enabling the heart or soul or spirit within to lead me to those life values that are most important to me.

And if I may offer just one more: I wish I had understood the concept of self-forgiveness. I think had I been self-forgiving sooner, I wouldn’t have wasted so much time, energy, and pain trying to become what I thought other people wanted me to be. With my insecurities, I struggled with trying to become a businessman as defined by the media and the other neurotic people, as opposed to just being who I was. Now, I am completely naked as who I am, which is just a grown-up, little boy who’s filled with love and wants to create a better place in the world. I wish I knew back then that it’s OK to be filled with love. But that’s not what the start-up culture, the exit culture, the business media wants to promote. What they want to promote is how many eyeballs you have, how many followers you have, how many this and how many that…and that’s not a service of love. That’s not truly creating value. So, I wish I could have accepted myself for who I was and forgiven myself when I needed it. I could have shown up in the world much earlier as my genuine and authentic self—the one you’re speaking with right now.

Once we reach authenticity, that’s when we can find joy. You know, whoever you are is who you are. And you know what? When that happens, when you reach authenticity, that’s when you’ll discover that life is not just OK–it’s awesome! And that’s when you’re going to find that people love you the most. People love authenticity. People love people who are emotionally available and who know they are flawed. It’s OK. We’re all flawed. People really identify with that; they appreciate it because it’s so rare.

What is one hope you have for the next 10 years?

My hope is that we, as an organization, and I, as an individual, do more to raise consciousness around the globe. I think if we can raise the level of consciousness globally, we have an opportunity to save the planet and survive as a species. My greatest hope is to see a continued expansion of peaceful people and consciousness. What you see going on in politics and in the mainstream press is focused on conflict. And conflict is killing us.

In the 20th century alone, humans killed over one hundred million of their fellow humans in conflict. So we must raise our level of consciousness to joy, love, and peace; we must be at peace with one another and accept one another. We need to accept that we have differences. It’s back to this idea of expectation rather than appreciation. We expect others to be like us instead of appreciating them for who they are. That’s where all these conflicts come from. So we want to raise consciousness as an organization and help people live a better, more joyful, loving, peaceful life… and to live with health through nature’s logic. We do that with wine now, but we’ll be bringing other natural and healthy products to the market in the future.

Are there any books or resources you would like to recommend to our readers?

My number one recommended book of all time is The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle. My favorite book that most people have never heard of was published in 1912 by an author named Charles Haanel—it’s called The Master Key System. These are the two books that have made the biggest impact on my life. Neither of them is about business but both are the key to great financial success.

Are there any parting remarks you’d like to share with our readers?

I’d like to give them a penny bottle of wine. I have a special promotion for them. They can go to www.dryfarmwines/happyliving and they’ll find a page there where they can get a one-penny bottle of wine. We’d give it away but it’s against the law to give alcohol away!

If anyone would like to contact me, I can be reached at todd@dryfarmwines.com

In final closing: spread more love. The more people you can love and tell them that you love… sharing love… you’re going to get that energy back. So, I love you. I appreciate this time. And I wish everyone in your audience a life of peace and joy and harmony. And love!

Thank you Todd for sharing your very inspiring story… and I want to thank you for your support up in Portland at the World Domination Summit. You inspired some of the guys I was with to get back into their meditation practice. You, and the love you are sharing everywhere you go, are improving the health and wellbeing of the world, one person at a time. Keep it up, my friend!

Follow Todd…

Twitter | Facebook | Website

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